Monthly Archives: March 2014

The Quest

In essence, I wanted to design a tracking system that will help my kids understand and celebrate their own progress while not making me absolutely¬† crazy with thousands of little pieces of paper (or *shudder* excel). Here’s what I came … Continue reading

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Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale

Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid’s Tale, (McClelland and Stewart, 1985). It is tempting to think of the dystopic society described in The Handmaid’s Tale as implausible. Given current conditions in the U.S. and other similar countries, a society in which women … Continue reading

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Philip Roth’s The Ghost Writer

Roth, Philip. The Ghost Writer, (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux, 1979). Nathan Zuckerman, Philip Roth’s most famous character, never seems to do much of anything. Many times, one almost forgets he is there. In The Human Stain, my favorite Roth novel, … Continue reading

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Frederick Coppleston’s History of Philosophy, Vol 1: Greece and Rome

Copleston, Frederick. A History of Philosophy, Vol 1: Greece and Rome, (Image Books, 1962). There are less taxing ways to learn about philosophy. Frederick Copleston spends about as many pages talking about ancient western philosophy as Bertrand Russell spent on … Continue reading

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Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style

Strunk, W., & White, E.B. The Elements of Style: Illustrated, (Penguin Press, 2005). The most famous principle contained in The Elements of Style is, in my edition, #17: Omit Needless Words. “Vigorous writing,” we are told, “is concise. A sentence … Continue reading

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